Meet your deputies to General Convention – Part 2

Meet your deputies to General Convention – Part 2

The Rev. Roberto Maldonado-Mercado

Home Congregation: Santa Cruz/Holy Cross, Hillsboro

Number of General Conventions attended:  2

Legislative Committee: Evangelism & Church Planting Committee 

Why is General Convention important to you? 

It is an opportunity to help shape the future of The Episcopal Church and to participate in the direction and work of my beloved church. It also gives me the opportunity to make my voice heard as a member of the Diocese of Oregon deputation, and as an individual of Hispanic/Latino origin to also be a spokesperson for the needs of people of color.


What are you looking forward to the most for this year’s General Convention? 

After the original date was postponed due to Covid-19, I feel that what I expected the most was to be able to return to work on things related to General Convention. Taking up the legislative work of General Convention with the resolutions presented to the convention and the budget, and giving direction to the church. In addition, there are vital matters to attend to, such as resolutions on racial reconciliation, the Book of Common Prayer, etc.


What is one thing you want people in Oregon to know about General Convention?

That many of the ideas, interests, and concerns we have in the Diocese of Oregon are shared by other dioceses and we can work to correct, improve, and take necessary action for the benefit of the entire church. All are working for the common good.


What is something about yourself that you’d like the diocese to know? 

That I have a lot of passion for bilingual, Spanish/English work, that after more than thirty years of service I love my vocation and try to help others through mentoring and education.

Alan Murray

Home Congregation: Trinity Episcopal Cathedral

Number of General Conventions attended:  3

Legislative Committee: Social Justice and United States Policy

Why is General Convention important to you? 

For someone who is not a cradle Episcopalian, I have a deep appreciation for our polity and governance which is highly democratic. The early founders of the Episcopal Church had decided that no one person or body should have full control of the church and our church will be governed by a Convention which is made up of an elected body represented by a bishop, clergy, and laity. General Convention is a place where all voices are heard, and important issues that shape the direction of our church are debated. I love the fact that all our social justice resolutions that are passed at General Convention enable our Episcopal Public Policy Network to take up the work of advocacy in a non-partisan way.


What are you looking forward to the most for this year’s General Convention? 

After almost 2.5 years of battling the pandemic, I am looking forward to reconnecting with old friends and making some new ones in a very much scaled back Convention which is shorter in duration and smaller in attendance. I am looking forward to hearing new ideas about what the church of the future looks like.


What is one thing you want people in Oregon to know about General Convention?

The first General Convention was in 1785 in Philadelphia when there was only one House (House of Deputies). William White (priest) was the first President of the House of Deputies and was consecrated as a bishop in 1787. The House of Bishops was formed in 1789 and William White became the President of the House of Bishops. He was the only Presiding Officer who ever served on both Houses.


What is something about yourself that you’d like the diocese to know? 

This will be my 4th General Convention. I love the work of church governance. I do not take our democratic process for granted. Church governance is not just a canonical requirement. It is hard gospel work in making sure that our church is engaged in difficult issues so that we can live into the dream of God in becoming the Beloved Community. I love mentoring a new generation of leadership. I have done so in my previous and current deputations and with the Deputies of Color. As a person of color, I am grateful to have a seat at the table as we work together on racial justice and healing.